HOME

NEWS

CHARITIES

VOLUNTEER

ACTION CENTER

ADD CHARITY

CONTACT

SUPPORT

World Environment Community Health Animals Celebrity Submit A Site Find A Charity
Blind dolphin population increases

The News International

1254 days ago   Article ID# 990062
Original URL

 

World Wildlife Fund

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN (The News International) - Despite unfavourable conditions and looming threats, the number of blind Indus dolphins has increased during the past few years in the Dolphin Reserve stretches between Guddu and Sukkur barrages, says a latest survey conducted by the Sindh Wildlife Department.

The survey revealed that during the last count conducted by the Sindh Wildlife Department in 2006, the number of the Indus dolphins in the reserve was around 810 but now over 916 dolphins have been counted between Guddu and Shah Belo.

The experts are still to cover 15km long sector from Shah Belo and Sukkur where three to five big dolphin schools are located and it is expected that the population of dolphins in these schools would be around 100, increasing the total number of the blind dolphins above 1,000. The team of Sindh Wildlife Department would probably complete the survey in the remaining portion at the end of this week

The Sindh government declared the area between these two barrages as the Indus River Dolphin Reserve in 1974. These dolphins, measuring between 1.5 and 2.5 meters in length and weighing a maximum of 90 kilograms, do not have a crystalline eye lens and so are blind. They navigate underwater entirely by a sophisticated echo-location system. The physical touch gives them important information about their surroundings and helps them find food.

World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has also completed its survey between Chashma and Sukkur Barrage and would make public its report after two weeks. A total of 15 experts contributed in the survey in which all relevant data has been collected to assess number of dolphins and threats to their lives due to multiple reasons.

Coordinator of Indus River Dolphin Conservation Project of WWF-Pak, Uzma Naureen Khan, told this correspondent that they had started their survey on March 28 and after conducting hectic and in-depth studies it got completed on April 20.

We are now sorting out the data and would make reports to ascertain the population of blind Indus dolphins between Chashma and Sukkur Barrage. The findings of the survey would also help identify the growing threats to life of blind dolphins, she said.

She said there is a slight increase in the number of dolphins in 2009 survey but it had not increased as much as it should have because protected areas were designated to conserve this rare specie.

Uzma said they have also collected samples of water to have a clear picture about level of pollution and other related factors that caused death of six dolphins in the recent past.

Copyright 2014 The News International   (Copyright Terms)
Updated 1254 days ago   Article ID# 990062

World Wildlife Fund    View Charity Profile    Visit Website

More World Wildlife Fund News

Australia ranked 13 by WWF for ecological footprint

14 hours ago From theguardian.com 

LONDON, U K - ...

Earth lost 50% of its wildlife in the past 40 years, says WWF

14 hours ago From theguardian.com 

LONDON, U K - ...

Half of world's animals have disappeared since 1970

14 hours ago From telegraph.co.uk 

LONDON, U K - ...

New trade regulations for greater protection to endangered sharks

18 days ago From Times of India 

NEW DELHI, INDIA - Canadian cable partners include CHCH, CHECK, AMI, Gusto TV, ... of the cancer charity Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF) Canada, said nearly ...

Black bear sighting in Vietnam indicates conservation success

58 days ago From Wildlife Extra News 

HEREFORD, U K - Lymphoma to be exact. "I started rubbing her neck and I felt awful lumps," recalled McGee. Pearl may have a fighting chance to survive if she is treated ...

Go to page:   1    2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next >> 

<< Return To Animal News

Action Center

Antarctic sea ice set for record high as Arctic heads for sixth lowest extent

Action: Climate Change

The extent of sea ice in Antarctica is set to reach a record high, scientists said on Tuesday, as they announced that Arctic ...

Tigers recorded in Thailand's Salakpra Wildlife Sanctuary for the first time

Action: Wildlife Conservation

Conservationists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) have for the first time captured images of a tiger in Salakpra W ...

Leaders pledge to end deforestation by 2030

Action: Stop Deforestation

Dozens of companies, non-profit organizations, and governments pledged to work together to halve forest loss by 2020 and end ...

Coal mine has heavy impact in Indonesian Borneo

Action: Stop Pollution

Baharuddin should be happy. The rambutan and durian trees flanking his home are heavy with fruit. Two hectares of chilies str ...

Ocean acidification could lead to collapse of coral reefs

Action: Save Our Oceans

An expedition from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Carnegie Institute of Science has measured a roughly 40% reduct ...

View All Actions >>

 

 

Charities

News

Follow Us

Support

Find A Charity

Action Center

World

Community

Facebook

Twitter Support

Contact

Volunteer

Add A Site

Environment

Animals

Google+

Privacy Policy

Copyright

 

 

Health

Celebrity

Terms of Service

Copyright The Charity Vault All rights reserved.