World Environment Community Health Animals Celebrity Submit A Site Find A Charity
Blind dolphin population increases

The News International

1675 days ago   Article ID# 990062
Original URL


World Wildlife Fund

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN (The News International) - Despite unfavourable conditions and looming threats, the number of blind Indus dolphins has increased during the past few years in the Dolphin Reserve stretches between Guddu and Sukkur barrages, says a latest survey conducted by the Sindh Wildlife Department.

The survey revealed that during the last count conducted by the Sindh Wildlife Department in 2006, the number of the Indus dolphins in the reserve was around 810 but now over 916 dolphins have been counted between Guddu and Shah Belo.

The experts are still to cover 15km long sector from Shah Belo and Sukkur where three to five big dolphin schools are located and it is expected that the population of dolphins in these schools would be around 100, increasing the total number of the blind dolphins above 1,000. The team of Sindh Wildlife Department would probably complete the survey in the remaining portion at the end of this week

The Sindh government declared the area between these two barrages as the Indus River Dolphin Reserve in 1974. These dolphins, measuring between 1.5 and 2.5 meters in length and weighing a maximum of 90 kilograms, do not have a crystalline eye lens and so are blind. They navigate underwater entirely by a sophisticated echo-location system. The physical touch gives them important information about their surroundings and helps them find food.

World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has also completed its survey between Chashma and Sukkur Barrage and would make public its report after two weeks. A total of 15 experts contributed in the survey in which all relevant data has been collected to assess number of dolphins and threats to their lives due to multiple reasons.

Coordinator of Indus River Dolphin Conservation Project of WWF-Pak, Uzma Naureen Khan, told this correspondent that they had started their survey on March 28 and after conducting hectic and in-depth studies it got completed on April 20.

We are now sorting out the data and would make reports to ascertain the population of blind Indus dolphins between Chashma and Sukkur Barrage. The findings of the survey would also help identify the growing threats to life of blind dolphins, she said.

She said there is a slight increase in the number of dolphins in 2009 survey but it had not increased as much as it should have because protected areas were designated to conserve this rare specie.

Uzma said they have also collected samples of water to have a clear picture about level of pollution and other related factors that caused death of six dolphins in the recent past.

Copyright 2015 The News International   (Copyright Terms)
Updated 1675 days ago   Article ID# 990062

World Wildlife Fund    View Charity Profile    Visit Website

More World Wildlife Fund News

WWF calls for a quick action to protect the endangered snow leopards in India

29 days ago From newseveryday.com 


Three Amazon nations, three approaches to reducing deforestation

33 days ago From news.mongabay.com 


Snow leopards may soon vanish, thanks in part to climate change

33 days ago From huffingtonpost.com 


Sustainable fashion brand is saving the earth, one scarf at a time

55 days ago From magazine.good.is 


Italy's glaciers retreated by 40 percent

57 days ago From timesofindia.indiatimes.com 


Go to page:   1    2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next >> 

<< Return To Animal News

Action Center

Climate change endangers Antarctica's iconic species

Action: Climate Change

Antarctica is best described in superlatives: It is the coldest, windiest, driest and highest continent on Earth - along with ...

Defend Joshua Tree from massive dewatering

Action: Wildlife Conservation

Home to desert tortoises, bighorn sheep and numerous rare and imperiled plants, Southern California's Joshua Tree National Pa ...

Deforestation signs the death sentence for 36 to 57 percent of Amazon trees

Action: Stop Deforestation

Deforestation signs the death sentence for 36 to 57 percent of Amazon trees according to the findings of an international tea ...

Stop oil trains in the Northwest

Action: Stop Pollution

In the wake of Keystone XL's rejection, oil companies anxious to reroute their toxic assets have set their sights on pushing ...

Preservatives from cosmetics build up in the bodies of far-flung marine mammals

Action: Save Our Oceans

Compounds from our makeup and bathrooms are winding up in the bodies of dolphins, sea otters, and polar bears sometimes tho ...

View All Actions >>





Follow Us


Find A Charity

Action Center




Twitter Support



Add A Site




Privacy Policy






Terms of Service

Copyright The Charity Vault All rights reserved.