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Planting for the future's children

By Sera Whippy, Fiji Times

1419 days ago   Article ID# 761705
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World Wildlife Fund

SUVA, FIJI (Fiji Times) - In an effort to claim its stake as one of Fiji's most sustainably sound resorts, Shangri-La's Fijian Resort and Spa planted 240 mangrove seedlings over the weekend.

In partnership with the World Wildlife Fund, close to 50 participants got down and dirty in the soggy environment.

"We are planting these mangroves not for today and not for us but for the benefit of future generations," said resort general manager Michel Monk.

WWF conservation director Charles Avis was amazed at the interest shown by the youths and workers at the resort.

"Mangrove destruction and tourism have never gotten along on the same page," he said. "However, this shows that the tourism industry and the environment can forge a great and sustainably- protected environment together.

"Mangroves are vital for any Pacific island nation because of the crucial role they play. Our fish rely on these trees, so we should continue to plant and protect them."

The mangroves were placed in a channel between the mainland and Yanuca Island on which the resort is located. One hundred and fifty seedlings were previously planted there.

"These were planted by the Cuvu College Environment group two months ago," said the sanctuary's service manager Mereoni Mataika.

Copyright 2014 Fiji Times   (Copyright Terms)
Updated 1419 days ago   Article ID# 761705

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