HOME

NEWS

CHARITIES

VOLUNTEER

ACTION CENTER

ADD CHARITY

CONTACT

SUPPORT

World Environment Community Health Animals Celebrity Submit A Site Find A Charity
EPA Asks Nine Companies to Disclose Chemicals for Gas Extraction

By Jim Efstathiou Jr., Bloomberg

2212 days ago   Article ID# 635067
Original URL

 

Natural Resources Defense Council

NEW YORK, NEW YORK (Bloomberg) - Business Exchange Twitter Delicious Digg Facebook LinkedIn Newsvine Propeller Yahoo! Buzz Print Federal regulators asked companies including Halliburton Co. to disclose chemicals used to dislodge underground natural gas after residents in two states where the practice is widespread were warned not to drink well water.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency asked nine oil service companies to identify chemicals they employ in hydraulic fracturing for a study on potential threats to drinking water, the agency said yesterday in a statement. In fracturing, millions of gallons of chemically treated water are forced into underground wells to break up rock and allow gas to flow.

The EPA action is likely to heighten the debate over drilling for gas locked in shale formations, which is accelerating along with concern over possible health and environmental risks. Such production may produce 50 percent of the U.S. gas supply by 2035, up from 20 percent today, according to IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates.

“EPA is taking seriously its charge to examine the risks associated with hydraulic fracturing,” Kate Sinding, senior attorney with the New York-based Natural Resources Defense Council, said in an interview. “As EPA goes forward with its studies, we may well see recommendations about what the states can and should be doing better, as well as plans for more federal oversight.”

Wyoming, Pennsylvania

On Aug. 31, the EPA told residents of Pavillion, Wyoming, not to drink water after benzene, methane and metals were found in groundwater. Pennsylvania regulators issued a similar warning to residents near Chesapeake Energy Corp.’s gas wells after reports on Sept. 2 of water bubbles in the Susquehanna River. States have taken the lead in overseeing the boom in hydraulic fracturing after the EPA’s oversight role was limited by a 2005 energy bill. Congress is debating legislation to give the EPA explicit authority over the process.

Since 2008, 1,785 wells have been drilled in Pennsylvania’s portion of the Marcellus Shale, a gas-rich rock formation from New York to West Virginia. New York regulators have placed a moratorium on new gas drilling and the state senate voted in August to prohibit new permits until May 15.

The EPA will hold public hearings on the issue in Binghamton, New York, next week.

“The companies have different views on whether or not they should be providing this information,” Kevin Book, managing director at ClearView Energy Partners LLC, a Washington-based policy analysis firm, said in an interview. “The EPA is nudging in everywhere they see what looks like state accommodation.”

Halliburton Statement

Houston-based Halliburton said it would comply with the request.

“Halliburton supports and continues to comply with state, local and federal requirements promoting the forthright disclosure of the chemical additives that typically comprise less than one-half of one-percent of our hydraulic fracturing solutions,” Teresa Wong, a Halliburton spokeswoman, said yesterday in an e-mailed statement.

EPA’s request for companies to volunteer the information also went to Schlumberger Ltd.; BJ Services Co., which was acquired this year by Baker Hughes Inc.; Complete Production Services Inc.; Key Energy Services Inc.; Patterson-UTI Energy Inc.; RPC Inc.; Superior Well Services Inc. and Weatherford International Ltd., according to the agency’s statement.

“We are pro-actively evaluating all of our wells in the area and we are prepared to take all necessary steps to remedy the situation,” Chesapeake spokesman Brian Grove said in an e- mail. “Based on comprehensive field testing, the issue does not pose a threat to public safety or the environment.”

‘Misinformation’ Campaign

Gas drilling is safe and will benefit residents and produce tax revenue, the Hamburg, New York-based Independent Oil & Gas Association of New York, an industry group whose directors include representatives from Halliburton and Talisman Energy Inc., said in a statement. Critics of fracturing in New York have waged a “a calculated campaign of misinformation and ignorance,” said IOGA executive director Brad Gill.

“Our position is generally we have no qualm with disclosing what it is we’re adding to the water we’re pumping,” Joe Winkler, chief executive officer for Houston-based Complete Production Services, said in an interview.

Since 2009, the EPA has been investigating complaints of tainted groundwater in Pavillion, Wyoming, in Fremont County, about 100 miles (161 kilometers) west of Caspar. While the latest round of tests detected petroleum hydrocarbons, including benzene and methane, in wells and in groundwater, the agency said it could not pinpoint the source of the contamination.

More Tests

Further tests are planned. The EPA is working with Calgary- based EnCana Corp., the primary gas operator in the area, according to a statement.

Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake was issued a notice of violation and is working with Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection to determine the source of gas detected in the Susquehanna River and at six private water wells this month. The Chesapeake wells haven’t been fractured with water and chemicals and aren’t producing gas.

“This scientifically rigorous study will help us understand the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water, a concern that has been raised by Congress and the American people,” EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson said in a statement.

Copyright 2016 Bloomberg   (Copyright Terms)
Updated 2212 days ago   Article ID# 635067

Natural Resources Defense Council    View Charity Profile    Visit Website

More Natural Resources Defense Council News

U.S. to world: Protect dolphins, whales or lose access to U.S. seafood market

49 days ago From biologicaldiversity.org 

TUCSON, ARIZONA - ...

U.S. Supreme Court denies effort to overturn Tongass National Forest protections

185 days ago From earthjustice.org 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - ...

Government’s move to end grizzly protections sparks opposition

205 days ago From takepart.com 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - ...

Groups file UNESCO petition to save monarch world heritage site in Mexico

535 days ago From enewspf.com 

PARK FOREST, ILLINOIS - ...

EPA sued for failing to protect monarch butterflies

578 days ago From newsmaine.net 

PORTLAND, MAINE - ...

Go to page:   1    2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next >> 

<< Return To Environment News

Action Center

The world just hit this disturbing climate change metric

Action: Climate Change

Earth has seemingly passed a worrisome threshold for the changing climate this week, according to scientists.

...

Madagascar’s largest tortoise could become extinct in 2 years

Action: Wildlife Conservation

One of the world’s rarest tortoises, the ploughshare tortoise, is about to become extinct.

Fewer than 100 plou ...

Deforestation jumps into Peru reserve, 1,600 hectares of rainforest lost

Action: Stop Deforestation

Deforestation is pressing further into a protected area in central Peru, finds a recent analysis by the Monitoring the Andean ...

River pollution puts 323m at risk from life-threatening diseases, says UN

Action: Stop Pollution

A week before Russia’s Daldykan river was turned red by a leak from a metals plant, the UN issued a warning as chilling as it ...

Save these ocean beauties from extinction

Action: Save Our Oceans

A relative of squid and octopuses, the chambered nautilus is an ancient ocean mollusk that's survived five major mass extinct ...

View All Actions >>

 

 

Charities

News

Follow Us

Support

Find A Charity

Action Center

World

Community

Facebook

Twitter Support

Contact

Volunteer

Add A Site

Environment

Animals

Google+

Privacy Policy

Copyright

 

 

Health

Celebrity

Terms of Service

Copyright © The Charity Vault All rights reserved.