HOME

NEWS

CHARITIES

VOLUNTEER

ACTION CENTER

ADD CHARITY

CONTACT

SUPPORT

World Environment Community Health Animals Celebrity Submit A Site Find A Charity
Snails Are Saving Endangered Gorillas

By Jennifer Viegas , Discovery News

1551 days ago   Article ID# 464619
Original URL

 

Wildlife Conservation Society

SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND (Discovery News) - Humble snails are helping to prevent Cross River gorilla poaching in Nigeria, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

The WCS has just launched a new program that promotes snail farming, which helps local people generate income, provides an alternative source of animal protein, and hopefully will eliminate illegal hunting of what is Africa’s rarest and most endangered great ape.

Eight former gorilla hunters were selected from four villages to participate in the new initiative. With help from the WCS, they've constructed snail pens, each of which was stocked with 230 African giant snails. Because of the snail’s high protein content, coupled with low maintenance costs, quick results, and easy replication, snail farming is expected to catch on quickly.

Just as French chefs prize snails, locals there view these gastropods as a delicacy and the high demand for them in villages and larger communities makes the prospect of farming viable.

“People living near Cross River gorillas have trouble finding alternative sources of income and food and that’s why they poach,” said James Deutsch, Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Africa program. “We are working with them to test many livelihood alternatives, but perhaps the most promising, not to mention novel, is snail farming.”

Once thought to be extinct, Cross River gorillas were rediscovered in the 1980s. The most endangered of the African apes, Cross River gorillas now number less than 300. Even if just a handful are taken as bushmeat, the killings can really put a dent in the gorilla's already weakened population.

Get this: The operation cost per year for each snail farmer, after necessary replacement of nets and cement and labor costs, is estimated at only $87. The profit, after expenses, with the sale of an average of 1500 snails per bi-annual harvest, is estimated at $413 per year. The meat of one gorilla, on the other hand, fetches about $70.

“Cross-River gorillas depend on law enforcement and conservation efforts to survive,” says Andrew Dunn, WCS Nigeria Country Director. “The work of WCS and our dedicated field-staff to develop alternate livelihoods for local poachers is just one step on the road to recovery for these incredible animals.”

Copyright 2014 Discovery News   (Copyright Terms)
Updated 1551 days ago   Article ID# 464619

Wildlife Conservation Society    View Charity Profile    Visit Website

More Wildlife Conservation Society News

WCS to Manage Key Wildlife Reserve for Elephants in Nigeria

60 days ago From Newswise 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA - Newswise — The Wildlife Conservation Society announced today that it will partner with Bauchi State Government to manage the conservation of ... Flag as irrelevant Edit this alert You have received thi ...

Uganda sets up an online database to monitor arrests and identification of repeat poachers

159 days ago From Wildlife Extra News 

HEREFORD, U K - Dr. Felix Shardonofsky, who has 30 years of experience in respiratory medicine, including 10 years at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, ... Flag as irrelevant New interactive classroom resource gets student ...

Saving Elephants in Central African Republic: A Conversation With Andrea Turkalo

162 days ago From Huffington Post 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - Andrea Turkalo is Associate Conservation Scientist at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and cofounder of Cornell University's The Elephant ... Flag as irrelevant Photos: mass turtle hatching produces over ...

Microsoft buys Madagascar carbon credits

164 days ago From Mongabay.com 

MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIA - Apart from the celebs and guests that are spotted at such events, those working quietly to make the event a perfect one are the volunteers. These ... Flag as irrelevant ...

China to destroy ivory stockpile

207 days ago From Mongabay.com 

MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIA - Terry Griffith, 55, a civil and environmental engineer who spent most of his career at the Environmental Protection Agency, and Janna Owens, 56, ...

Go to page:   1    2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next >> 

<< Return To Animal News

Action Center

Melting glaciers giving rise to new lakes in Himachal Pradesh

Action: Climate Change

Melting of glaciers is resulting in the formation of smaller lakes in the high hills of Himachal Pradesh and is posing threat ...

Invasion of the oil palm: western Africa's native son returns, threatening great apes

Action: Wildlife Conservation

As palm oil producers increasingly look to Africa’s tropical forests as suitable candidates for their next plantations, prima ...

Almost 90,000 acres of wildlife-rich land saved in 12 months

Action: Stop Deforestation

Nearly 90,000 acres has been successfully protected by the World Land Trust (WLT), including areas in Bolivia and Mexico, sin ...

Hercules begins clean-up of contaminants along southern, eastern boundaries

Action: Stop Pollution

Hercules, Inc. has begun a clean-up of on and off-site contamination that the Environmental Protection Agency said will prote ...

30 new Marine Protected Areas for Scotland

Action: Save Our Oceans

The Scottish Government have announced they have given the go-ahead for 30 more Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), to protect a f ...

View All Actions >>

 

 

Charities

News

Follow Us

Support

Find A Charity

Action Center

World

Community

Facebook

Twitter Support

Contact

Volunteer

Add A Site

Environment

Animals

Google+

Privacy Policy

Copyright

 

 

Health

Celebrity

Terms of Service

Copyright © The Charity Vault All rights reserved.