World Environment Community Health Animals Celebrity Submit A Site Find A Charity
UNICEF and partners promote girls' education in Darfur, Sudan

UNICEF-press release

1694 days ago   Article ID# 1477200
Original URL


United Nations Children's Fund

NEW YORK, NEW YORK (UNICEF-press release) - No one quite knows how Qud al Haboob elementary school got its name. From its location, on the dusty outskirts of Darfur’s largest town, Nyala, one may surmise it refers to the blinding haboob dust-storms that sweep periodically across much of Sudan.

Aside from its unusual name, the school has another, more telling, distinction – the number of girl students who attend. Of 186 students, 98 are girls.

Fifteen-year-old Habiba Ahmed is one of them. Now in the fifth grade, she lists Arabic and Quranic studies as her favourite subjects, and dreams of becoming a nurse.

Not even the school’s spartan conditions – none of the classrooms are equipped with chairs or desks – can damping her enthusiasm.

“Some of my friends don’t go to school,” she said. “But education is important because an uneducated person has no chance in life.”

Barriers to girls’ education

It’s a message that too many parents in this western region of Sudan have yet to grasp. Too often, girls are kept from school to herd animals or do household chores. Others are married off at a very early age. The student body at Qud al Haboob is an important exception to the rule.

School Director Fatma Elnour says poverty is the main underlying reason that so few parents are willing to invest in their daughters’ education.

“The school fees are small, but they are too much for many families,” Ms. Elnour explained.

Conflict is another barrier to education. The unrest that swept Darfur in 2003 forced Abaker Suleiman to make the painful decision to take his children out of school.

“We had livestock and depended on them,” Mr. Suleiman recalled. “But then the animals were stolen, and we were left with nothing. So I had no choice but to pull all four of our children out of school.”

Now 20 years old, Amani, Mr. Suleiman’s eldest daughter, is well aware of the opportunity that was taken from her.

“When I’m staying at home and I see other girls going to school, it makes me sad,” she said. “In this village, there are more girls at home than at school.”

Bringing girls into the classroom

In an effort to boost the number of girls in school, UNICEF is working hand-in-hand with the government and other partners. Central to the strategy is an effort to make both the learning experience and the school environment more child-friendly – not least by providing water and toilet facilities.

“One challenge is the school fees,” says UNICEF Education Specialist Idrissa Diarra. “We need to work on how to alleviate the cost of education for poor families by providing school materials and more support to the community.”

To this end, UNICEF is supporting the State Ministry of Education by constructing learning spaces and providing textbooks and other education supplies – costs which would otherwise have to be met by parents.

By bringing more girls into the classroom, South Darfur – like the country as a whole – has much to gain. Harnessing this human potential will greatly improve Sudan’s potential to meet the enormous developmental challenges that confront it.

Copyright 2016 UNICEF-press release   (Copyright Terms)
Updated 1694 days ago   Article ID# 1477200

United Nations Children's Fund    View Charity Profile    Visit Website

More Unite For Children News

UNICEF scores vaccine deal that would avert millions of childhood deaths globally

8 hours ago From romper.com 


UNICEF wants Nigeria to end abuse of children

34 hours ago From pulse.ng 


Keep children safe in Mosul operation, UNICEF says

2 days ago From unicef.org 


A national 5-day polio vaccination campaign launched

2 days ago From mexicostar.com 


200,000 girls in Sierra Leone to receive support from UNICEF and DFID to gain access to education

6 days ago From salonemonitor.net 


Go to page:   1    2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next >> 

<< Return To World News

Action Center

Precious corals bleached to death

Action: Climate Change

The good news is that the current El Niño, a warm ocean current that drove temperatures up worldwide, is finally on its way o ...

Scientists warn Federal agency's plan would 'result in extinction of red wolves in the wild'

Action: Wildlife Conservation

Last month, the USFWS announced that it would recapture 32 of the 45 wolves in the wild and leave only those on federal lands ...

Gold mining deforestation in Peruvian reserve surpasses 450 hectares

Action: Stop Deforestation

In the past two months, another 100 hectares of tropical rainforest have been demolished in Tambopata National Reserve, where ...

Oregon: Say no to a massive new factory farm

Action: Stop Pollution

Oregon officials are considering whether to permit a new factory farm in the northeast's Umatilla River Basin, and we need yo ...

No, the Great Barrier Reef is not dead, but it is very, very sick

Action: Save Our Oceans

The Great Barrier Reef, the world’s largest living structure, was trending on social media Friday, after it was declared dead ...

View All Actions >>





Follow Us


Find A Charity

Action Center




Twitter Support



Add A Site




Privacy Policy






Terms of Service

Copyright © The Charity Vault All rights reserved.