HOME

NEWS

CHARITIES

VOLUNTEER

ACTION CENTER

ADD CHARITY

CONTACT

SUPPORT

World Environment Community Health Animals Celebrity Submit A Site Find A Charity
Jaguars cling to survival in Argentina's forests

By Kylie Stott, Reuters

1778 days ago   Article ID# 1253164
Original URL

 

World Wildlife Fund

LONDON, U K (Reuters) - The musty jaguar pelts on display at a government office in Buenos Aires are a grim reminder of the big cat's precarious existence in Argentina's northern forests.

The Iguazu waterfalls that border Paraguay and Brazil mark what is now the outer limit of the jaguar's range.

Just 50 of the big cats are estimated to live in the sub-tropical jungle around the famous falls.

Out of sight of the tourist hordes, Argentine scientists have been monitoring one of the nation's last remaining jaguar populations since 2003.

Project Jaguar's aim is to fit the animals with GPS tracking collars in order to observe how they are affected by farming and other activities.

Most years they normally register two or three animals during a month-long tracking campaign, but this time not a single jaguar has been trapped for fitting with a collar so far, team leader Agustin Paviolo told Reuters Television.

"The population risk studies we've conducted in collaboration with the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago indicate that in a medium-term period of between 20 and 30 years, the likelihood of extinction is quite high if we don't take action to reduce the threats to this population," he said.

Argentina's northern forest have been classified as one of the areas where jaguars are least likely to survive, along with parts of Brazil, Venezuela and Guyana and most of its ranges in Central America and Mexico.

The jaguar used to roam up into southern parts of the United States and down to Patagonia, but they now occupy only 40 percent of their historic range.

The World Wildlife Fund estimates that only 15,000 are left in the wild as deforestation deprives them of prey and makes them more vulnerable to hunters.

HUNTING STILL A THREAT

About 18,000 jaguars were killed globally every year for their fur in the 1960s and 1970s and hunting remains a threat to them today despite anti-fur campaigns.

The stuffed jaguar, jaguar-skin rug and jackets on display at the government's Environment and Sustainable Development office were seized by officials in recent years.

Red Yaguarete (Jaguar Network), a voluntary group that works to get hunters prosecuted, was involved in the first two cases in Argentina in which people were fined for selling jaguar skins last year.

"People used to show us the bodies and the skulls when we visited different areas," said Nicolas Lodeiro Ocampo, president of the group. "That hardly ever happens now because people are more aware of the penalties."

The group says there is increasing evidence that foreigners are hunting the animals for sport, though most animals are killed by farmers who lose livestock to the jaguars.

But despite some progress to crack down on poaching, hunters are rarely convicted by over-stretched courts.

"(If a) judge has 5,000 or 6,000 cases to handle, among them kidnappings or drug-trafficking, that affects ... the interest they could have in environmental issues like jaguars," said Marcelo Silva Croome, an official at the government's National Wildlife Directorate.

In Iguazu, the Project Jaguar team says the forest needs the jaguar as much as the jaguar needs the forest.

"In areas where large predators are disappearing ... the ecosystem starts to lose equilibrium," Paviolo said. "For the jungle to remain as it is, we need to have these predators."

Copyright 2016 Reuters   (Copyright Terms)
Updated 1778 days ago   Article ID# 1253164

World Wildlife Fund    View Charity Profile    Visit Website

More World Wildlife Fund News

Music legend Usher, Christina Aguilera, others provide soundtract for Nature’s Beauty on DSTV

8 days ago From naija247news.com 

ABUJA, NIGERIA - ...

21 arrested for sale of illegal wildlife products

16 days ago From gbtimes.com 

TAMPERE, FINLAND - ...

Chasing survival: Many species face climate change's ultimate test

57 days ago From insideclimatenews.org 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK - ...

Leonardo DiCaprio, Prince William celebrate birth of two rare baby rhinos

77 days ago From ecowatch.com 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - ...

Christina Aguilera, Usher and Ellie Goulding to present animal documentary for the Discovery Channel

89 days ago From metro.co.uk 

KENSINGTON, U K - ...

Go to page:   1    2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next >> 

<< Return To Animal News

Action Center

As the earth sizzles this summer, demand climate action

Action: Climate Change

2016 is on track to be the hottest year on record around the globe, and the drumbeat of bad news continues: Climate change is ...

Stop the fossil fuel industry from bulldozing this roadless national forest

Action: Wildlife Conservation

Right now, you can help save pristine roadless forest in Colorado by telling the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to protect t ...

Orangutans face complete extinction within 10 years, animal rescue charity warns

Action: Stop Deforestation

Orangutans will be extinct from the planet within 10 years unless action is taken to preserve forests in Indonesia and Malays ...

Say no to these three uranium mines at Grand Canyon

Action: Stop Pollution

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality is preparing to issue permits to allow the operation of three uranium mines i ...

Obama's offshore drilling puts whales and dolphins in peril, groups warn

Action: Save Our Oceans

Environmental groups have turned on the Obama administration over offshore oil and gas extraction, warning it puts whales and ...

View All Actions >>

 

 

Charities

News

Follow Us

Support

Find A Charity

Action Center

World

Community

Facebook

Twitter Support

Contact

Volunteer

Add A Site

Environment

Animals

Google+

Privacy Policy

Copyright

 

 

Health

Celebrity

Terms of Service

Copyright © The Charity Vault All rights reserved.